How to Manage Hot Flashes of Menopause with Self Help Methods?
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How to Manage Hot Flashes of Menopause with Self Help Methods?

Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause and perimenopause. Managing hot flashes with alternative therapies or natural methods is the best approach one can adapt because it involves least or no side effects. This article offers self help methods to treat hot flashes which every women facing menopause period can adopt easily. Hot flashes are experienced by many women, but not all women undergoing menopause experience hot flashes. A hot flash is a feeling of warmth that spreads over the body, but is often most strongly felt in the head and neck regions. Hot flashes may be accompanied by perspiration or flushing. Hot flashes usually last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Although the exact cause of hot flashes is not fully understood, hot flashes are thought to be due to a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations brought on by declining estrogen levels.

Hot flashes are a common symptom of menopause and perimenopause. Managing hot  flashes with alternative therapies or natural methods is the best approach one can adapt because it involves least or no side effects. This article offers self help methods to treat hot flashes which every women facing menopause period can adopt easily.

Hot flashes are experienced by many women, but not all women undergoing menopause experience hot flashes. The hot flush, or flash, is well known as the classic menopausal symptom and affects 60–85% of menopausal women. Hot flushes and sweats are called vasomotor symptoms and vary immensely in both their severity and duration; for many women, they occur occasionally and do not cause much distress, but for about 20% they can be severe and can cause significant interference with work, sleep and quality of life.

A hot flash is a feeling of warmth that spreads over the body, but is often most strongly felt in the head and neck regions. Hot flashes may be accompanied by perspiration or flushing. Hot flashes usually last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Although the exact cause of hot flashes is not fully understood, hot flashes are thought to be due to a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations brought on by declining estrogen levels.

Self-help methods to manage menopausal symptoms:

  • Coping with hot flushes - wear layers of clothing, which you can easily peel off and put on again. Wear natural fibres. Use cotton bedding and nightclothes, which absorb moisture more efficiently.
  • Avoiding hot flushes - keep hot drinks such as tea and coffee, alcohol and spicy foods to a minimum. Avoiding tea and coffee is also a good idea because caffeine can cause insomnia and lead to calcium being lost from the body. Try a herbal alternative.
  • Don't smoke - smoking increases the risk of heart disease and osteoporosis, so if you've been thinking about giving up but never quite got around to it, now is the time to quit for good.
  • Stick to a healthy diet and get plenty of exercise - this will help to keep stress levels to a minimum, as well as being of physical benefit. It's never too late to start.
  • Drink plenty of water - it's a great cleanser and purifier and can help with many of the symptoms, including hot flushes, headaches and dry skin.
  • Try to stay positive - and remember, this is only a temporary phase in your life.
  • Get support - having people around you who understand what's going on is invaluable.
  • Try to notice what triggers your hot flashes and avoid those things. Possible triggers to consider include spicy foods, alcohol, caffeine, stress, or being in a hot place.
  • Use a fan in your home or workplace.
  • If you still have menstrual periods, ask your doctor if you might take low-dose oral contraceptives (birth control pills). These may help symptoms and prevent pregnancy. Continue to use contraception - for two years after your last period if you're under 50, or otherwise a year.
  • Try taking slow, deep breaths when a flash starts.
  • If you’re overweight, losing weight might help with hot flashes, according to one recent study.

Evening primrose oil and vitamin E have been suggested as a preventive measure for hot flushes, but there is little evidence to show they work. Lifestyle changes may help alleviate hot flashes. These include avoiding caffeine, hot drinks, chocolate, spicy or hot foods and alcohol

Useful links and resources:

* Alternative Treatments for Hot Flashes of Menopause

* Hot flushes

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Comments (3)

Excellent information!

thanks for the tips. I do experience hot flashes from time to time. These tips will help me cope with the uncomfortable feeling.

good share

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